How to Install Oxidized for Network Configuration Backup

Oxidized is an open-source project started by Saku Ytti and Samer Abdel-Hafez as an alternative to the very popular RANCID software. A little over a year ago, I created a RANCID server to backup the configuration of my network devices. It has been a good, stable piece of software that has been doing the job very well across hundreds of devices.

When I set up the RANCID server, I had heard of Oxidized, but the project wasn’t yet as far along as it is now. A few days ago, I decided to take another look at it. One of the things that made Oxidized more appealing to me right away is its companion web interface. While RANCID can be “web-enabled” with the viewvc interface, it is pretty limited in functionality. I found the Oxidized web interface to be exactly what I was looking for. It also supports a very wide range of network devices and network operating systems.

Compared to using viewvc with RANCID, Oxidized also lets you view current configurations and diffs between versions. However, Oxidized lets you search for terms across all the configurations. If only some of your devices have a very specific configuration or inventory item, you can search and only the devices matching will be displayed. For example, in my environment, I can search for “PVDM” and quickly see which of my Cisco routers contain DSPs.

The web interface is also very fast! I have approximately 500 devices being backed up, and the web interface is always extremely responsive. Another feature of the web interface is the status of the last device configuration poll. You can see how long it takes on average to pull a configuration from the device, the number of times the configuration backup failed, the failure rate, and the time of the last failure. This helped me to identify a broadband link that was consistently slow, because the average run time was much more than the other devices.

As wonderful as Oxidized is, one of its current drawbacks is a lack of good, complete documentation. When I set up an Oxidized server for my environment, I documented all of the steps I took, including caveats I encountered, to have a successful install. The following is a guide to setting up an Oxidized server on CentOS 7 with basic web authentication. Like many Linux-related installation instructions, there are multiple ways to reach the ultimate goal, and what I have done may not be the best, most secure, or optimized way, but I reached the end goal of a working installation.

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