jed@neckercube.com   |   Experience & Credentials

 LinkedIn: jedcasey     Twitter: @Wax_Trax

 GitHub: Wax-Trax    GoodReads

Most Recent Posts:

QoS in Action

Quality of Service is an added-value network infrastructure service that is still very important within the scope of private networks. Some might argue that QoS is not as important as it once was as we start to see more SD-WAN deployments that utilize the general Internet for transport, because the Internet has no inherent QoS. Additionally, many private networks do ...
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The Data Center Move, Part 4

Part 1  |  Part 2  |  Part 3  | Part 4 Over the next couple of weeks, we continued to migrate more portions of the network and less-critical systems over to the new data center. One of the issues we experienced was temporary route instability due to accidentally advertising the same routes through multiple BGP ASNs because of redistribution. The ...
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The Data Center Move, Part 3

Part 1  |  Part 2  |  Part 3  | Part 4 After the servers were connected, we were getting complaints about intermittent connectivity. I would do a continuous ping against one of the servers, and it would randomly drop one or two packets out of every 20 or so, and then every 10 minutes it would completely lose connectivity for ...
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The Data Center Move, Part 2

Part 1  |  Part 2  |  Part 3  | Part 4 One of the nicest things about migrating the data center is we get a chance to start somewhat fresh and hopefully do things correctly (or rather, more “current” from a best practices perspective). As I’ve witnessed myself, network complexity builds up over time. Temporary “band-aid” fixes unintentionally become permanent ...
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The Data Center Move, Part 1

My posts are sometimes (nearly always) kind of long. I thought I'd try something different and break this one up into multiple parts. Part 1  |  Part 2  |  Part 3  | Part 4 Sometimes in life, the best experience comes from being in the right place at the right time. I studied enterprise networking for years while being employed ...
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Anki, My New Love

This post was also featured on PacketPushers.net Until now, I was never one to use flashcards. I could not see their value, and I was too lazy to actually write things down on a paper flashcard (and my handwriting is horrible). I recently discovered a program called Anki. On the surface, it is just a flash card program, but underneath, it ...
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Bringing an Old Mac Pro Back to Life with ESXi 6.0

It's been quite a while since I've done a purely technical post. The original Mac Pro is a 64-bit workstation-class computer that was designed with the unfortunate limitation of a 32-bit EFI. The two models this post discusses are the original 2006 Mac Pro 1,1 and the 2007 Mac Pro 2,1 revision. Both systems are architecturally similar, but the 2006 model ...
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Experiences with Cisco VIRL Part 2: INE’s CCIE RSv5 Topology on VIRL

This blog entry was also featured on PacketPushers.net VIRL topology + INE RSv5 ATC configs After getting VIRL set up and tweaked to my particular environment, my next step is to set up INE’s CCIE RSv5 topology, as this is what I will be using VIRL for the most, initially. I was satisfied with using IOL, but I decided to ...
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Experiences with Cisco VIRL Part 1: Comparing and Tweaking VIRL

This blog entry was also featured on PacketPushers.net Since it has been out for more than a year, and has been developed and improved tremendously during that time, I decided to finally take the plunge and buy a year's subscription to the Cisco VIRL software. Until now, I have been using any combination of real hardware, CSR1000Vs, and IOL instances for studying ...
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Hey, Wait…I Thought You Started Blogging in 2012?

It's true, I did start this blog in October 2012. In June 2018, I made the decision to prune all of my entries before December 2015. I spent a couple of hours reading over the majority of these entries and realized they are no longer relevant to my life and current career trajectory. When I started this blog, I was ...
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About Me:

I am currently employed as a Senior Network Engineer for a midsize enterprise in the healthcare industry. I started out in SMB networking and have been working on enterprise networks for nearly five years, during which I have gained an enormous amount of practical knowledge and experience.

Ivan Pepelnjak wrote an excellent piece “On I-Shaped and T-Shaped Skills” which highly influenced the things I have decided to focus on. I enjoy “routing and switching” which is why I worked to obtain skills to the expert level in that area. Yet, I am constantly learning and rounding out my skillset in other areas as well, such as the fundamentals of automation, wireless, datacenter technologies, and more.

The computer network represents the arteries of the modern business environment, with the data flowing across as the lifeblood. By having expert level networking knowledge, and fundamental knowledge of what interacts with the network as a whole, I am in a better position to help an organization thrive on produced and consumed data.

Experience:

I passed the Cisco CCIE Routing & Switching written exam, and later attempted the lab exam. I gained many skills that go far above and beyond the CCNP level, including multicast, QoS, and MPLS experience (both enterprise and service provider sides).

As part of my study, I released to the public some of the study materials I had created for myself, including a deep, detailed mind-map, a collection of documentation links based on topics, and a collection of nearly 3500 flash cards.

I designed and integrated a VeloCloud-based SD-WAN environment to migrate away from a 350-site MPLS L3VPN WAN. This included a 15-site trial/PoC environment from one provider, and eventually a full production rollout using a different provider. During the migration phase, there were at one point two separate MPLS L3VPNs, two separate SD-WAN environments, two datacenters, and 350 sites supported simultaneously. I used BGP at the datacenters and various kinds of filtering and BGP policy adjustments to harmoniously stitch all of the environments together for full connectivity between all sites.

I designed and implemented the network portion of an enterprise disaster recovery plan (similar to but slightly more complex than my post Easy Disaster Recovery Plan)

I participated in the networking aspects of moving an in-house datacenter to a colocation facility, and detailed the aspects of maintaining connectivity between the old and new datacenters during the migration and lessons learned during the process.

Miscellaneous:

I wrote a 3-part series On Learning describing the methods I discovered which work best for me to learn, retain, and manage large amounts of knowledge.

Using Bridge Domain Interfaces on Cisco ASR-1K Routers

Using Python, YAML, Jinja2 and multithreading to rapidly generate and push configurations to multiple devices. One of the ways I used this knowledge in production was to generate a large configuration set of firewall rule changes.

My thoughts on network automation in general (2018)

I renewed my CCNP certification in 2016 and released two posts, one on various SWITCH topics, and one on various ROUTE topics.

I needed a simple configuration backup system for the hundreds of Cisco routers and switches on my network. I initially used RANCID, but then learned how to use Oxidized.

Current Credentials:

  • University of Central Florida (UCF):
    Bachelor of Science: Information Systems
  • Certified Wireless Network Professional (CWNP): CWNA
  • Cisco: CCNP Routing & Switching
  • Cisco: CCDP Network Design
  • Cisco: CCNA Wireless
  • Cisco: CCDA Network Design
  • Cisco: CCNA Routing & Switching

Previous Credentials:

  • Juniper: JNCIA
  • VMware: VCP-DCV

Contact Information:

jed@neckercube.com   |   Experience & Credentials

 LinkedIn: jedcasey     Twitter: @Wax_Trax

 GitHub: Wax-Trax     GoodReads

I am open to new challenges and opportunities, particularly in the service provider vertical.